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ILO Recommendation 205  

Employment and Decent Work for Peace and Resilience 

Changes in climate, demographic patterns, access to resources and the COVID-19 pandemic mean that a series of transformations in the nature of risks will take place over the next twenty years, and these will be more serious than in the past; This will change the coal industry, one of the most polluting industries in the world. 

The responses provided in this evolving context show the constant relevance and vital and decisive role that Labor Law plays, through the creation of decent employment opportunities and the generation of income, in crisis contexts for the prevention, recovery and development of resilience.

Essential guidance

International labor standards - and in particular ILO Recommendation 205 - provide essential guidance to face current and future challenges in the world of work. These guidelines put the promotion of full, productive, freely chosen employment and decent work at the center of action, being the set of policies that help put it into practice a decisive factor to break the vicious circle of crises and can lay the foundations for build sustainable economies and communities. 

An up-to-date instrument

This recommendation is a timely and up-to-date instrument to guide ILO constituents - representatives of governments and employers 'and workers' organizations - in managing the problems of the world of work in crisis situations. It was adopted by the International Labor Conference in 2017 as a result of a two-year process of tripartite consultations to revise and replace the Employment Recommendation.


In a panorama of massive layoffs in the mining sector, as it have been experienced in Colombia, remembering the strategic approaches of the recommendation fits like a glove. Just remember point “f”  from clause  III “Strategic approaches”. It affirms “providing guidance and support to employers to enable them to take effective measures to identify, prevent, mitigate and account for how they address the risks of adverse impacts on human and labor rights in their operations, or in products, services or operations to which they may be directly linked” and the lack of dialogue measures that these mining companies have had with their employees.

We invite you to read the entire ILO recommendation and ask yourself what is in your hands to make the transition happen fairly in developing countries.